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Author Topic: Recommendations for lightweight gear  (Read 13610 times)

admin

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Recommendations for lightweight gear
« on: August 10, 2009 »

With so much choice on the market and everyone wanting to continuously go lighter it would be useful if people could post positive (or bad) experiences they have had with lightweight gear to give others some confidence in what to buy and what to avoid. That way before someone has to spend £200 on a piece of kit, they can at least have some idea that what they're buying is any good (although obviously there's no need to only post on expensive gear)!

Please mention if the gear is something you own personally, is something you have heard good things about or is an item that you know someone else rates highly. Gear should be anything you might need for a day or couple of nights on the hill. Also if you could find the weight of the item it would be useful (but not essential).
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Wolf_Larson

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2009 »

I think all light gear is expensive ??
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chris

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2009 »

I think all light gear is expensive ??

Doesnt have to be that way. Think about it you could pay money for a super light spork or rip down to the local mcdonalds and get one for free thats even lighter. Ultra light termal mugs cost a bomb but a polystyrene mug does excatly the same and weighs nothing, use a bottle of water from the shop, its strong super light and super cheap! I know we all love to buy new gear (I'm prob the worst for it!) But Going ultra light doesnt have to be ultra expensive, more like ultra immaginative!
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Wolf_Larson

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2009 »

LOL that is very ture when you put it that way. Well said, but im still going to buy that hillebery soulo  ;D
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chris

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2009 »

LOL that is very ture when you put it that way. Well said, but im still going to buy that hillebery soulo  ;D
My intention was not to put you off a purchase, at the end of the day its your money and we can buy what ever we want! If your looking for lighthweight tents you might want to look at the terra nova range, VERY lightwight and good quality and a good bit cheaper that the hillberg which would leave you a few bob for the other bits and pieces you need.
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Wolf_Larson

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2009 »

Cheers ill get a look.
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ulsterwalker

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2009 »

A big thumbs up for TerraNova! Certainly not cheap, but either are Hilleberg. In particular the Laser Competition, which I think it pretty much perfect, check out the tent reviews section for a brief review.

Generally all high quality gear is expensive, and things are always going to go in the direction of lightness when you are carrying it.
 Cheap, Light, good quality; choose 2

When it comes to lightening up, the "big 3" are where to look, i.e your pack, sleeping system and tent. If I'm only out for a night my pack is sub 700grams (OMM Jirischana 35 RL), sleeping bag + mat is around 550 grams (rab topbag and foam roll mat) and my tent is around 950 grams (TerraNova Laser Comp.) I rate each piece very highly, but did a good bit of research before paying for them.

Although everything else you pack will make a difference to your pack weight, these 3 items are generally where you can lose the most weight.
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666_pack

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2010 »

seabass is not a lightweight food.
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suspectmonkey

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2010 »

seabass is not a lightweight food.

Probably lighter than leg of lamb and Magners though :D
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pinki

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2010 »

This topic is of muck interest to me also as I have carried way too much gear in the past, and I need to drop the pounds, personally and in luggage.

Get a light rucksak, but make sure it is strong, big, and comfortable enough for your needs. Like shoes/boots, get it wrong and you are in for a world of hurt.
I use a thermarest. Don't know the model, but it is 3/4 length and very light.
I have just bought a sleeping bag from Decat*** which is 680g and about 3L in volume, my previous was 1280g, so that is a pound lighter.
I bought a titanium meths cooker from ebay, and though light at about 28g, I really do not like it.
Tents have their uses, but I prefer a hammock and tarp (though I have to get a new tarp). Lighter and more versitile.
Leave all the crap at home, difficult as it might just come in handy...
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twentyclicks

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2011 »

Homemade micro tarp - 190g, fits in the hand - repels rain, wind, foxes etc
Homemade alpine pack - 720g ~45L - needs hipbelt for big loads but survived 2 flights and 16 days continuous use (minor revisions needed and non-critical errors in workmanship showed up)

Alpkit Y-pegs - 14g each - can bend/break if hitting with a huge rock into solid ground but hold stupidly well for the weight/price.

MSR titan kettle - 125g - use one, caress one, experience it's mimimal perfection in construction, put stuff in it.
MSR pocket rocket - 86g - like making tea with a eurofighter. It's ferocity is somehow comforting.
MSR travel towel (small) - 26g - dries a tad better than lifeventure towel I have, rings out amazing, but even the small can be cut in half as you only need a hand-sized bit to dry yourself!

iPod shuffle - 28g - 2GB, 12-15hr battery.

Thermarest NeoAir - 400g - hmm. Very strong if packed carefully (away from rubbing/sharp objects). I had great sleeps and not great sleeps using for 2 weeks mainly on solid ground. Many factors though. Would like to try a few days with a Z-rest (440g) to compare. Packs small in your bag but needs blowing up, squeaks & rustles when you move, and makes a lot of noise expelling all that air - a bit antisocial at campsites... and expensive!!!

Victornox Classic Mini SD - 23g - great for nail-care, cutting bandages, paper, beards. Toothpick & tweezers great. Team it up with a larger blade Opinal or Mora for all your regular cutting needs. A Gelert can/bottle opener is 8g.

Poundland pillow - 58g - holds good pressure, can sit on it, durable, cheap, adds massive comfort.

Orikaso folding cup/plate - 52g/46g - genius, good size, really works. Slides down back of pack. 10yr guarantee on hinges!

Spork (light my fire) - 10g - works for me, never fails.

I second the regular plastic bottle. Love a 750ml sport top. Recycle when it dies.


Will post very detailed gear list later on used for the GR20.
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Craigy123

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2014 »

"MSR pocket rocket - 86g - like making tea with a eurofighter" Actually made me laugh out.

Anyway let me share some of my lightweight ideas with you.

Laser comp: Own: Dont actually like it. I'm not sure If I'm putting it up wrong but with anything more than light wind and rain it gets damp as the outer hits the inner.

RAB Generator Jacket: Own: love it, super light, really warm and very packable without the constant worry of getting the down wet and how to wash it, its filled with primaloft.

Alp-kit Ti pegs: own: These are great. they hold so well and are very light. Vital kit in my mind.

I've an osprey day pack and ruck sac. Both are very light weight, well made and pack well. The draw back is the are a little fragile. I have worn holes in the day pack where it has scraped off rocks.

Leitchfield treklite 200: own: I got this tent for £18 off ebay and I'll be honest, its better than many tents at 10 times the price. FYI leitchfield is Vango!Its very light, lots of room and packs well. Only draw back is the whole inner is mesh, so its quite fresh in there!

Jet Boil: Own: Oh some controversy now! In my opinion if you just need to boil water I find its hard to beat the jetboil. Stick a boil-in-bag meal in, heat it. one hot take it out and throw some coffee in. Packs small and is all self contained. May will say the are useless, but for what they actually do, they do it well.

I've seen some flameless cookers on a few websites now, basically you add water, set a stainless tray in place and some chemicals do the cooking, I guess this would be lightweight? What do you do with left over heat packs?

Therm-a-rest Neo Air XTherm: coming: I managed to get this for £117 and the reviews on it are excellent. 2 wilders used these on thursday night and initial reports are good.

Rab Accent 700: own: This bag goes to minus 26 extreme and for the weight and cost I think its a great piece of kit. I got mine on sale in Cotswold for £140

Life venture Ti knife, fork and spoon: own: super light weight but I really only use the fork and spoon, but as they are separate I rarely bring the knife. £25

I'm constantly looking up new kit and looking at lighter options, but you cut your suit according to your cloth, I've no kids or house to pay for so I can spend my money on this stuff, my respect goes to the ones who can come up with low cost ways to lighten the load.

I'd like people reviews on freeze dried foods, which ones have you tried? ease of use etc. any I tried have to sit for about 10 minutes, if its 2 degrees outside and raining the last thing you want is sitting 10 minutes waiting for a look warm meal in the end, which might not even be that good.
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polroger

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2014 »

Own:

If you are looking for a ultra lightweight rucksack - GoLite Jam 50 is fantastic. It will hold everything you need and can reduce its volume when required. Very clever!!



http://www.backpacker.com/may-2012-gear-review-golite-jam-50-backpack/gear/16629
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GMB

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #13 on: January 15, 2014 »

I'd like people reviews on freeze dried foods, which ones have you tried? ease of use etc. any I tried have to sit for about 10 minutes, if its 2 degrees outside and raining the last thing you want is sitting 10 minutes waiting for a look warm meal in the end, which might not even be that good.

IMO Mountain House are the best for freeze dried meals. Taste great and give a good dose of calories for the weight. Get yourself a sheet of the foil covered bubble wrap and make a wallet that you can drop the bag into when you've added the water. Keeps the meal bag insulated whilst the meal rehydrates. You'll have a piping hot meal every time.

Link below gives an idea.

http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/cooking-accessories/QE102.html
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george81

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Re: Recommendations for lightweight gear
« Reply #14 on: January 15, 2014 »

Struggling with the selection of a new sleeping bag myself.. want something light that compresses small, want down bag and needs t handle cold. I have been tinking of the RAB ascent 700 as already mentioned or Alpkit pipedream 600 seems to get good reviews although cant find them avalable on Alpkits website.

Any other sugestions? think I'll be putting whatever I get into sea to summit waterproo compression so the included compression sack quality will not really be an issue..


George
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